Bradley G. Green

Nullus Intellectus Sine Cruce

 

Who's Online

We have 6 guests online

Augustine School

Login Form



Home - Dr. Bradley G. Green
Thomas Weinandy and Impassibility PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Monday, 24 September 2012 14:41

A number of years ago I stumbled upon Thomas Weinandy's book, Does God Suffer (Notre Dame, 2000).  To my mind it is the best thing available on the impassibility of God.  In particular, I have re-read chapter 8, "The Incarnation--The Impassible Suffers", numerous times.  Reading this chapter alone is like taking a first-rate seminar on Christology.  If you can find a copy, this book is highly recommended.  Here is an essay by Weinandy that appeared in First Things magazine back in 2001, summarizing the heart of his argument.



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Monday, 24 September 2012 18:38 )
 
Henri Blocher Tackles the Doctrine of Everlasting Punishment PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 09:36

Perhaps one of the most challenging and difficult doctrines for Evangelicals (and all traditional Christians) is the notion of everlasting punishment.  To my mind, one of the finest treatments is the essay by Henri Blocher on the topic, found in Nigel Cameron, ed., Universalism and the Doctrine of Hell. I recently found a sermon online by Blocher on this difficult issue.  It can be accessed here.



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Monday, 24 September 2012 19:49 )
 
Russell Kirk and the Southern Tradition PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Tuesday, 18 September 2012 08:46


The Imaginative Conservative
has posted an older essay by Clyde Wilson, where Wilson reflects on Russell Kirk's appreciation and affirmation of the Southern tradition.  Kirk's book on John Randolph of Roanoke (his master's thesis!) expressed great appreciation for the Virginian.  Similarly, Wilson notes that Kirk had read the agrarian Donald Davidson's The Attack on Leviathan with great appreciation (and Kirk subsequently made sure it was re-published).  And Kirk's appreciation for South Carolinian John C. Calhoun was profound (see here for an earller post on Kirk on Calhoun).  Wilson's essay is a good introduction to Kirk's appreciation of the Southern tradition.



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Tuesday, 18 September 2012 11:17 )
 
Constitution Day PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Monday, 17 September 2012 15:57


Happy Constitution Day.  In celebration of the Constitution of the United States, here is a link to a piece I wrote recently on the constitution; here is a link to a post from a while back; here is a link where Joe Sobran recounts his trek to the Constitution. 



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 September 2012 22:04 )
 
Living Amidst the Ruins: The Search for Political Wisdom in a Post-Constitutionalist Age PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Wednesday, 12 September 2012 05:22

 

The Imaginative Conservative

 

As the 2012 election draws near, I have wanted to put a few things down on paper.  I have just had an essay published on the web site of The Imaginative Conservative, which is a wonderful site.  They have a great collection of essays both older and new.  My piece is titled, "Living Amidst the Ruins: The Search for Political Wisdom in a Post-Constitutionalist Age."  It can be accessed here.  Enjoy!



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Tuesday, 25 September 2012 08:26 )
 
Russell Kirk on John C. Calhoun PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Monday, 03 September 2012 09:35

A number of years ago I had the pleasure of meeting Clyde Wilson.  Professor Wilson has spent many years editing The Papers of John C. Calhoun.  He taught history for many years at the University of South Carolina.  I was wanting to look up something on Calhoun the other day, and turned to Wilson's edited volume, The Essential Calhoun: Selections from Writings, Speeches, and Letters (Transaction, 2000).  I noticed (and had forgotten) that Russell Kirk had written the foreword to this one volume collection of Calhoun's writings (by the way, the introduction by Wilson himself is an excellent way to get acquainted with Calhoun).  Calhoun's own understanding of consitutional government, and of the way in which a constitutional government can slide into tyranny is arguably unmatched.  Calhoun wrote in 1842:

"As the Government approaches nearer and nearer to the one absolute and single power, the will of the greater number, its action will become more and more disturbed and irregular; faction, corruption, and anarchy, will more and more abound; patriotism will



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Saturday, 22 September 2012 22:20 )
Read more: Russell Kirk on John C. Calhoun
 
Jonathan Edwards on Perseverance PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Saturday, 01 September 2012 15:55

In working on a monograph titled Covenant and Command: Works, Obedience, and Faithfulness in the New Covenant, I am wrestling with a number of things, including the relationship of justification and sanctification (and between justification and perseverance in particular).

Jonathan Edwards wrestled with this at great length.  Here are a couple of selections from volume 19 of the Yale edition of his works (pages 202-203).

"So that although the sinner is actually, and finally justified on the first act of faith, yet the perseverance of faith, even then, comes into consideration, as one thing on which the fitness of acceptance to life depends. God the act of justification, which is passed on a sinner's first believing, has respect to perseverance, as being virtually contained in that first act of faith and 'tis looked upon and taken by him that justifies, as being as it were a property in that faith that then is: God has respect to the believer's continuance in faith, and he is justified by that, as though it already were, because by divine establishment it shall follow; and it being by divine constitution connected with that first faith, as much as if it were a property in it, it is then considered as such, and so justification is not suspended; but were it not for this it would be needful that it should be suspended, till the sinner had actually persevered in faith."



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Saturday, 22 September 2012 22:22 )
Read more: Jonathan Edwards on Perseverance
 
Geerhardus Vos on Paul and Jesus PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Thursday, 30 August 2012 11:27

One of the joys of trying to study and write is the multitude of serendipitous discoveries that one makes along the way.  I am trying to finish a monograph, Covenant and Command: Works, Obedience, and Faithfulness in the New Covenant (working title--no pun intended).  At present I am trying to deal with the question of justification and future judgment.  And I have turned to an older essay by Geerhardus Vos, "The Alleged Legalism in Paul's Doctrine of Justiification."  As I read the introduction I was struck by the prescient nature of Vos' thoughts.  Here is Vos, found in Redemptive History and Biblical Interpretation, ed. Richard B. Gaffin, Jr. (p. 383).  Vos speaks of

". . . the modern attempt to supplant the theology of the Reformation, so largely based on Paul, by a less elaborate, less speculative, more congenial, because supposedly more humanitarian type of religious thought.  As Paul is usually identified with the traditional theology, so Jesus has come to stand in many minds for the milder, more simple, form of Christianity toward which the tide has been setting for some time and seems to be setting ever increasingly.  The watchword, 'Back to Christ,' implies the charge, whether consciously realized or not, that Paul has deflected the original impulse imparted by Jesus to Christianity, by bringing to bear up on it another force of decidedly lower character.  If such a view could be historically justified, it would furnish the best conceivable defense of the modern desire to shake off the theological trammels of the past.  If it cannot be justified, if it can be shown that the theology of Paul is the legitimate offspring of the teaching of Jesus, then an equally strong apology for the type of religion inherited from the Reformation will have been furnished.  Paul being the true heir and successor of Jesus, all those who profess to be historic Christians must feel in some sense bound to Paul, as they desire to be loyal to Christ."

Well said.



Share this article:
Google! Facebook! TwitThis
Last Updated ( Monday, 03 September 2012 15:06 )
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 4 of 20