Bradley G. Green

Nullus Intellectus Sine Cruce

 

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Bradley G. Green
Matt Perman's "What's Best Next" PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Saturday, 02 May 2015 08:21

 

Matt Perman has written a very good book on using your time well, the nature of work, and all sorts of things that you should think about--if you want to work, think, write, etc., in a way which flows from your Christian committments.  Here is the Foreword and Introductory chapter.



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Last Updated ( Saturday, 02 May 2015 08:22 )
 
Dallas Willard on Poverty and Christian Spirituality PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Friday, 24 April 2015 12:28

I have found Dallas Willard's essay "Is Poverty Spiritual" very helpful.  Here is the essay.

Attachments:
Download this file (Willard.Dallas.Is Poverty Spiritual.pdf)Willard.Dallas.Is Poverty Spiritual.pdf[Dallas Willard on Poverty]5582 Kb


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Studying Hebrew in Cambridge PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Wednesday, 22 April 2015 12:12

 

From January through August 2014 my family lived in Cambridge, England.  It was an absolute joy. One of my goals was to read/study Hebrew.  I met virtually weekly with a friend at The Red Bull to do so.  My friend/Hebrew tutor recently sent me this picture of The Red Bull.  Good memories.



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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 22 April 2015 16:03 )
 
Allan Carlson on the Family in the United Nations PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Tuesday, 21 April 2015 21:26

Here is an essay/address by Allan Carlson titled: "A History of the Family in the United Nations," originally given in 2000.  The essay is here.



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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 21 April 2015 21:27 )
 
Althusius on Political Order PDF Print E-mail
Written by Brad Green   
Friday, 17 April 2015 08:00


We had a fascinating discussion in my Contemporary Christian Life and Practice class the other day. Eventually the conversation moved into questions of political order.  One way of understanding where we find ourselves is to think of two major tendencies in the modern era: a radical individualist tendency and a radical collectivists tendency.  So you might have (1) those who affirm a radical individualism (where persons are fundamentally/essentially non-social beings--and where social arrangements are simply artificial and non-essential to who we are), and you might have (2) a collectivist tendency (various forms of communism or socialism), where the fundamental reality is the centralized state which controls virtually all of reality (and the individual is swallowed up by this central power).

I was trying to illustrate for students that there are older models which have been largely eclipsed in the modern era.  Models which affirm multiple smaller and overlapping (and non-totalitarian) authorities or governments.  I had in mind the work of Johannes Althusius.  For Althusius there are these numerous  and overlapping authorities or "governments," none of which are absolute.  And particularly important, the most fundamental "sovereignty" lies at the lower levels of organization.  This kind of thinking is somewhat lost today (in a sense), but it may be that only in these older models of thinking are we going to be able to find more stable and sane thinking on the nature of political order and association.  Attached is a short piece I have written on Althusius, published in the Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine.
Attachments:
Download this file (Althusius.Green.Oxford Guide Essay.pdf)Althusius.Green.Oxford Guide Essay.pdf[Johannes Althusius]156 Kb


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Last Updated ( Friday, 17 April 2015 08:08 )
 
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